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Travelling with Animals

Girl and Dog looking out at sea

Reisen mit Tieren, © Ursula Kappus

29.09.2020 - Article

Dogs, cats and ferrets

According to EU law, valid since December 29, 2014, dogs, cats and ferrets that are transported across borders in the European Union must always carry a passport according to a uniform model, the so-called EU pet passport.  All officially authorized veterinarians in the EU can issue the pet passport. Specifically, a pet passport must include the following:

1. the owner of the animal with address,

2. optionally a photo of the animal,

3. name, type, sex of the animal including date of birth (if known) and fur dress,

4. Microchip number and date of implantation with implantation site (As an alternative to microchip identification, identification by means of a clearly legible tattoo is sufficient. However, this must have been done before July 3, 2011.),

5. all vaccinations with the name of the vaccine, the date and the period of validity; this information must be signed by the veterinarian and stamped

You can find more information on the pet ID at:

http://dgk.de/gesundheit/tiergesundheit/eu-heimtierausweis.html

(in Germany)

http://www.agriculture.gov.ie/pets/  (in Ireland)

A maximum of five pets per person can be accompanied by the owner or, alternatively, by an authorized person. The animals must not be intended for sale.

For entry from Ireland to Germany

When entering Germany from Ireland with dogs, cats or ferrets, it is assumed that

1. the animal is carrying the EU pet passport.

2. the animal is accompanied by a responsible person.

3. the animal is not intended to change hands.

4. the animal can be identified by a microchip

Old tattoo markings only continue to apply if it can be proven (e.g. by means of the EU pet passport) that the tattoo of the animal was carried out before 03.07.2011) and the tattoo is still legible and the animal can be clearly assigned.

5. the animal is over three months old (over six months when participating in competitions).

6. the animal is vaccinated against rabies.

7. An initial vaccination was carried out at least 21 days before the border crossing and

8. a repeat vaccination has been carried out since the first vaccination within the period specified by the vaccine manufacturer as the effective period. If the repeat vaccination was carried out after the effective period of the vaccination, this is considered the first vaccination.

9. Identification and vaccination have been attested by a veterinarian

Prohibition of entry and transit with puppies under 15 weeks

Puppies may only be imported into Germany or pass through Germany in transit with adequate vaccine protection against rabies. In this context, a distinction is made between animals coming from a listed third country and from a non-listed third country.

If the puppies come from a listed third country, they may be imported into Germany at the age of 15 weeks at the earliest (rabies vaccination after 12 weeks + 21 days to develop immunity).

Young animals from non-listed third countries are eligible for import at the age of 7 months at the earliest (rabies vaccination after 12 weeks + blood sample 30 days after vaccination + a waiting period of 3 months).

Detailed information can be found at:

https://www.bmel.de/EN/topics/animals/pets-and-zoo-animals/pets-and-zoo-animals_node.html

For entry from Germany to Ireland

When dogs, cats and ferrets enter Ireland and Great Britain, which are traditionally rabies-free, even stricter rules apply than for other countries. When entering a pet, it is assumed that

1. the animal is carrying the EU pet passport.

2. the animal is accompanied by a responsible person.

3. the animal is not intended to change hands.

4. the animal can be identified by a microchip (identification by a tattoo has not been sufficient since July 3rd, 2011).

Old tattoo markings only continue to apply if it can be proven (e.g. by means of the EU pet passport) that the tattoo of the animal was carried out before 03.07.2011) and the tattoo is still legible and the animal can be clearly assigned. The microchip should conform to ISO standard 11784 or Annex A to ISO standard 11785. If this is not the case, you have to carry your own scanner.

5. the animal is vaccinated against rabies according to the WHO standard. This vaccination must be in a suitable country and after the implementation of the microchip and at least 21 days before entering Ireland. The period of 21 days does not apply if there is an uninterrupted history regarding vaccination protection. An entry in the pet ID card with regard to the vaccine used, the vaccination date and the duration of protection is required. This information must be signed by a veterinarian and stamped.

6. The dog has been treated for tapeworms (Echinococcus) within the last 24 to 120 hours before the planned arrival time in Ireland. The tapeworm treatment must contain praziquantel. Treatment against ticks is not absolutely necessary, but is nevertheless recommended. Again, the veterinarian must sign and stamp the name, date and time of the treatment in the pet passport or in the veterinary certificate.

If the above requirements are not met, the animal must remain in official quarantine (as long as is deemed necessary) or returned after arrival in Ireland or the UK at the owner's expense.

You can find detailed information at:

http://www.agriculture.gov.ie/pets/

Please note that the Irish Department of Agriculture also offers a telephone information point for inquiries about traveling with animals:

Helpline: 1890 504 604

For calls from Germany: +353 1 6072827

Email: pets@agriculture.gov.ie


Prohibition of importing dangerous dogs

A) To Germany

According to the law on the restriction of moving or importing dangerous dogs into Germany, Pit Bull terriers, American Staffordshire terriers, Staffordshire Bull terriers and Bull Terriers, as well as their crossbreeds with each other or with other dogs may not be imported into Germany or brought into Germany.

Dogs of other breeds and their crossbreeds are also not allowed to be imported or brought from abroad, provided that they are suspected of being dangerous according to the regulations of the federal state in which the dog is to be kept permanently. The list of these dog breeds is determined by the individual federal states and thus changes from state to state. Alano, American Bulldog, Bullmastiff, Cane Corso, Dogo Argentino, Dogue de Bordeaux, Fila Brasileiro, Mastiff, Mastin Espanol, Mastino Napoletano, Pitbull Bandog, Perro de Presa Canario, Perro de Presa Mallorcin, Rottweiler and Tosa Inu are regularly listed.

The regulatory office responsible for your place of residence can provide you with further information.

The following dogs are excluded from the import and transfer ban:

1. Dangerous dogs that are carried by people who stay in Germany for up to four weeks (this applies in particular to tourist traffic)

2. Dangerous dogs from the current stock in Germany, which are reintroduced / brought from abroad

3. Service and handicapped assistance dogs as long as the dog owners have the papers required to check the animals (e.g. proof of parentage, vaccination certificate, character test certificate, other certificates from the responsible public order office).

Species protection requirements

The German authority responsible for questions regarding species protection requirements is the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation (Bundesamt für Naturschutz - BfN):

Bundesamt für Naturschutz / Dept. I1

Konstantinstr. 110

53179 Bonn

Tel .: + 49- (0) -228-8491-1311

Fax: + 49- (0) -228-8491-1319

Email: CitesMA@BfN.de

b) Prohibition of dangerous dogs from entering Ireland

Dogo Argentinos, Fila Brazilieros, Japanese Tosas, Pitbull Terriers are not allowed to enter Ireland.

It should be noted here that in Ireland and Great Britain “types” - and not breeds - are spoken of, as the types of dog mentioned are not recognized as breeds. Races not listed here that belong to one of the types mentioned can therefore be affected by the ban.

If in doubt, please contact the Irish Department of Agriculture directly.

Pet birds

a) For entry from Ireland to Germany

According to Paragraph 38 of the Internal Market Animal Disease Protection Ordinance, a maximum of three birds that are not intended for sale to third parties can be carried within the EU when traveling or when relocating.

In the case of parrots or parakeets, a special official veterinarian animal health certificate is required.

b) For entry from Germany to Ireland

The bird must be accompanied by its owner or an authorized person and must have a declaration of ownership. A pre-import declaration must be sent using the form (https://www.agriculture.gov.ie/pets/importintoirelandofpetbirds/formsofadvancenoticeandaccompanyingdeclaration/ ) to the following address at least 24 hours before the cargo arrives in Ireland:

Animal Health and Welfare Division

Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine

Kildare Street

Dublin 2, Ireland.

Hamsters, guinea pigs and rabbits

a) For entry from Ireland to Germany

When entering Germany with rabbits, three animals can be taken with you without any difficulty. If there are more than three animals, the rules of commercial trade that would apply to this animal apply.

Hamsters and guinea pigs are allowed to accompany their owners when entering Germany without having to observe any special conditions.

b) For entry from Germany to Ireland

The animal must be accompanied by its owner or an authorized person. An import pre-notification must be sent using the form (https://www.agriculture.gov.ie/pets/importpetmammalsintoireland/) at least 24 hours before the cargo arrives in Ireland to the following address:

Animal Health and Welfare Division

Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine

Kildare Street

Dublin 2, Ireland.

If you have any questions about importing certain animals, please contact the responsible authorities in Germany directly:

Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (Bundesministerium für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft)

11055 Berlin

Tel: 030/18529 - 0

Email: poststelle@bmel.bund.de

http://www.bmel.bund.de/

in Ireland:

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

Agriculture House

Kildare Street

Dublin 2

Ireland

Tel: 00353-1-607 2000

Email: pets@agriculture.gov.ie

www.agriculture.gov.ie

Other pets

If your pet is not listed above, please email us to explain your situation and we will be delighted to answer your questions.

Explanation of the pet passport

When entering from another member state of the European Union, a passport according to the EU-standard model (so-called EU pet ID card) must be carried with you, and show that your pet has had a vaccination and has immunity against rabies - if necessary after a booster vaccination. An inactivated vaccine with an efficiency of at least one international antigen unit according to the WHO standard must have been used.

A sample of the pet passport issued by another EU member state can be found in Annex III Part 1 of the Implementing Regulation 577/2013 / EU.

 

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